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Isidora Krstić

Isidora Krstić was born in 1987 in Belgrade, former Yugoslavia. She lives and works between Vienna and Belgrade. She is the co-founder of U10 Art Space in Belgrade.
In 2011, she received her Diploma in Painting from the Faculty of Fine Arts in Belgrade, in the class of Darija Kačić. She received her Master degree in Art and Science from the University of Applied Arts in Vienna, class of Virgil Widrich. She also studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna. Since 2006, she has continually shown her work, and has also worked with curatorial, organisational, publication and teaching projects in art.

In her work, she is concerned with the variability of human perception and the phenomenology of experience investigated through the topics of memory and identity, with a keen focus on post-colonial theory. She is interested in the human body as a medium for writing and expressing memories, and as a place where social, political and gender problems play out. She works with installation and site-specific interventions which include painting, objects, sculpture, drawing, collage, sound and work with text.

Arcadia, 11’17”

The work Arcadia deals with the dissonance between the subjective lived experience in a place versus the expectations. Spending some time in Sète, in the south of France, in the scope of an artist in residence program led to investigating the theme of idyllic landscapes, but also to pose the following questions - What makes a landscape worth admiring? And to whom do the surroundings and the experienced supposed beauty of a place belong to? In search of the answers, the artist embarks to find typically idyllic places. She finds them in parks, in dramatic views to the sea, and the botanical garden in Montpellier. The process itself would aid her feeling at home in the place that she had found herself in. The sound and editing of the video is meant to depict the dissonance between the subjective feelings and the wished experience, which results in the impossibility of feeling present in the given moment. Presence as a topic has nowadays gotten a new meaning as we realise that we cannot so easily be present in the places we want to - both physically as well as emotionally.

Interview

What is the language in common for the young people today?

For me, it is certainly a similar experience as important issues and problems that we face that are specific to one generation - and how we react to them. 

What does the process of making one of your pieces look like?

I work with different media - drawing, painting, collage, video, installation, and lately they are more objects and sculptures. Sometimes the process of creation is very abstract and starts from something very instinctive and intuitive - later I see that the work is very concrete and deals with one specific idea or set of ideas presented through that specific, sometimes abstract work. Sometimes it's the other way around, I start with an idea, and look for the right medium. This method is perhaps more complex, because one medium is often not enough, so my works require a form of installation, which is then directed and takes into account the visitor and work as a possibility of experience (experience). 

Which challenges have you faced while making art as you know it?

Size! I have wanted to go to huge formats for a long time, but it has its limits, and because of the production costs for creating one such work, and because of the limited space where it is exhibited. Lately, I want more and more to go outside the gallery, to different spaces, outside the white cube.

Do you consider yourself an artist, and what does that word mean to you?

I guess I did, because I have a continuous artistic practice, but that word always annoyed me because it is full of different meanings of what an artist is. In general, I don't like to say that I am an artist, but to do art. But I guess it's the same thing. The definition of an artist is constantly changing. At the moment, I think that the process of work and ideas should be demystified and simplified as much as possible - and the notion of an artist on the other hand carries with it the historical weight of mystifying and practicing some secret skill - that is something I wanted to gradually get rid of.

What is your escape from reality? Do you even have a need to escape from something?

In art or life? I love playing PlayStation! In general, I have always played computer games since I was little. It was a good escape from everyday life. I like in games that I am completely occupied and that I can't think of anything else, which is really good for me. I almost finished Horizon Zero Dawn and I’m completely mesmerized.

What does the word innovative mean to you?

In art or life? I love playing PlayStation! In general, I have always played computer games since I was little. It was a good escape from everyday life. I like in games that I am completely occupied and that I can't think of anything else, which is really good for me. I almost finished Horizon Zero Dawn and I’m completely mesmerized.

Do you have a plan for the future? Where can your artistic practice take you?

In art or life? I love playing PlayStation! In general, I have always played computer games since I was little. It was a good escape from everyday life. I like in games that I am completely occupied and that I can't think of anything else, which is really good for me. I almost finished Horizon Zero Dawn and I’m completely mesmerized.

What made the biggest influence on you to become what you are today and do what you do now?

In art or life? I love playing PlayStation! In general, I have always played computer games since I was little. It was a good escape from everyday life. I like in games that I am completely occupied and that I can't think of anything else, which is really good for me. I almost finished Horizon Zero Dawn and I’m completely mesmerized.

How would you describe Serbian (Balkan or European-depends on where you live and work) contemporary cultural scene?

Although I have been living in Vienna more or less constantly for almost 9 years, I regularly follow our scene, where the U10 art space (where I am still active) gives me a good platform for that. I think that our scene has a lot of interesting and high-quality things, but that it lacks much more support than the state. Primarily for the production of works. I think that is why our artists do not have such a presence abroad, because there is not enough support (for the production of works, travel, participation in exhibitions, etc.)

In which way does your creative process shape you or changes you as a person, if it does at all?

An interesting question. I had to think a little! I think I re-examine the creative process a lot. Lately, I have been trying to find a method and process that would be as honest as possible to an idea, as less mystical and complicated as possible. This in turn makes me reconsider and check how "pure" or honest the idea is - so it makes me have to be honest with myself first and then with the process - if that makes sense!